Farmstead record TDE 022 - Farmstead: Pond Farm

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Summary

Pond Farm, Thrandeston. 16th century farmstead and 18th century farmhouse. Regular courtyard multi-yard plan formed by working agricultural buildings. The farmhouse is set away from the yard. Significant loss (over 50%) of the traditional farm buildings. Located within a loose farmstead cluster.

Location

Grid reference Centred TM 1192 7728 (52m by 69m)
Map sheet TM17NW
Civil Parish THRANDESTON, MID SUFFOLK, SUFFOLK

Map

Type and Period (6)

Full Description

The farmhouse is an unlisted 18th and 19th century timber-framed structure, forming the northern side of a courtyard with a 16th century timber-framed barn of five bays to the west. At the time of the 1846 tithe survey the farm was a tenanted holding of 32.75 acres. The barn is typical of the latter 16th century (1580-1610 is likely), with edge-halved and bridled scarf joints in the roof-plates, internally trenched and cranked wall braces, jowled storey posts and arch-braced tie-beams. Its walls survive largely intact, together with a visually impressive series of arch-braced tie-beams, but the roof is mid-20th century. The interior originally had an internal partition which separated the northern bay from the rest. The four southern bays formed a threshing barn with an east-facing entrance, but the northern bay was a tall gateway. The resulting thoroughfare allowed vehicles to pass between the barn and a missing structure to the north. Pegged studs were inserted into both entrances during the 17th century and it's likely that the original arrangement was short lived. Early maps demonstrate that many modest Tudor farmsteads possessed fully or partly enclosed courtyards entered by gateways, but physical evidence is exceptionally rare. It sheds important light on the sophisticated nature of farm courtyards in England during the late medieval and Tudor periods and in my view merits listing at grade II. The adjoining 19th century clay-lump sheds, one of which was used as a stable, have been much altered, but are of some historic interest insofar as they illustrate a typical Victorian development. A heritage asset assessment was carried out for this barn, prior to its conversion to holiday lets (S1).

Pond Farm, Thrandeston. 16th century farmstead and 18th century farmhouse. Regular courtyard multi-yard plan formed by working agricultural buildings. The farmhouse is set away from the yard. Significant loss (over 50%) of the traditional farm buildings. Located within a loose farmstead cluster (S2-8).

Recorded as part of the Farmsteads in the Suffolk Countryside Project. This is a purely desk-based study and no site visits were undertaken. These records are not intended to be a definitive assessment of these buildings. Dating reflects their presence at a point in time on historic maps and there is potential for earlier origins to buildings and farmsteads. This project highlights a potential need for a more in depth field study of farmstead to gather more specific age data.

Sources/Archives (7)

  • <S1> Unpublished document: Alston, L.. 2011. Heritage Asset Assessment: Barn at Pond Farm, Thrandeston, Suffolk.
  • <S2> Unpublished document: Campbell, G., and McSorley, G. 2019. SCCAS: Farmsteads in the Suffolk Countryside Project.
  • <S3> Map: Ordnance Survey. 1880s. Ordnance Survey 25 inch to 1 mile map, 1st edition.
  • <S4> Map: Ordnance Survey. c 1904. Ordnance Survey 25 inch to 1 mile map, 2nd edition. 25".
  • <S5> Vertical Aerial Photograph: various. Google Earth.
  • <S6> Map: Ordnance Survey. 1949. Ordnance Survey 6 inch to 1, mile, 3rd edition. 1:10,560.
  • <S7> Map: 1845. Thrandeston Tithe Map.

Finds (0)

Protected Status/Designation

  • None recorded

Related Monuments/Buildings (0)

Related Events/Activities (2)

Record last edited

Apr 21 2021 12:55PM

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