Farmstead record CRP 021 - Farmstead: Clamp Farm

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Summary

Clamp Farm, Creeting St Mary. 19th century farmstead and 17th century farmhouse with converted buildings. Dispersed cluster plan formed by working agricultural buildings with additional detached elements. The farmhouse is set away from the yard. Significant loss (over 50%) of the traditional farm buildings. Located within a loose farmstead cluster.

Location

Grid reference Centred TM 0705 5758 (197m by 125m)
Map sheet TM05NE
Civil Parish CREETING ST PETER OR WEST CREETING, MID SUFFOLK, SUFFOLK

Map

Type and Period (4)

Full Description

Clamp Farmhouse is a grade II-listed building which lies in the Gipping Valley between Stowmarket and Needham Market, approximately 500 metres north of the river. At the time of the tithe survey in 1838 it formed part of a substantial holding of 171 acres, with a second farmstead of 141 acres known as Howe Farm immediately to the west. The unusually close proximity of this second farm, coupled with the disproportionately large scale of the two holdings with respect of the quality of their respective farmhouses, suggests the site may represent the remains of a medieval hamlet. In recent years the land and extensive agricultural buildings have been sold separately and converted. The rear range of Clamp farmhouse is a complete timber-framed house of the early-17th century to which a Gault brick front range was added in circa 1850 to create a ‘double-pile’. The 17th century frame is well preserved, with its original roof structure of wind-braced butt-purlins, and contains evidence of the usual three-cell layout (a central hall flanked by a cross-passage and twin service rooms to the south with a chimney bay and parlour to the north). The hall has now been combined with the service rooms to create a larger living space, and the chimney rebuilt to the same end. A detached clay-lump stable with a first-floor timber-framed granary to the north of the farmhouse is an addition of the mid-19th century which is probably contemporary with the Victorian façade. The building is a good example of its type, retaining its original brick floor and grain bins (S1).

Clamp Farm, Creeting St Mary. 19th century farmstead and 17th century farmhouse with converted buildings. Dispersed cluster plan formed by working agricultural buildings with additional detached elements. The farmhouse is set away from the yard. Significant loss (over 50%) of the traditional farm buildings. Located within a loose farmstead cluster (S2-7).

Recorded as part of the Farmsteads in the Suffolk Countryside Project. This is a purely desk-based study and no site visits were undertaken. These records are not intended to be a definitive assessment of these buildings. Dating reflects their presence at a point in time on historic maps and there is potential for earlier origins to buildings and farmsteads. This project highlights a potential need for a more in depth field study of farmstead to gather more specific age data.

Sources/Archives (7)

  • <S1> Unpublished document: Alston, L.. Historical Assessment: Clamp Farmhouse, Mill Lane, Creeting St Peter.
  • <S2> Unpublished document: Campbell, G., and McSorley, G. 2019. SCCAS: Farmsteads in the Suffolk Countryside Project.
  • <S3> Map: Ordnance Survey. 1880s. Ordnance Survey 25 inch to 1 mile map, 1st edition.
  • <S4> Map: Ordnance Survey. c 1904. Ordnance Survey 25 inch to 1 mile map, 2nd edition. 25".
  • <S5> Vertical Aerial Photograph: various. Google Earth.
  • <S6> Map: Ordnance Survey. 1949. Ordnance Survey 6 inch to 1, mile, 3rd edition. 1:10,560.
  • <S7> Map: 1839. Creeting St Peter Tithe Map and Apportionment.

Finds (0)

Protected Status/Designation

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Related Events/Activities (2)

Record last edited

Feb 3 2020 10:33AM

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